Call Queues – Who can be an agent

Call Queues are the modern, online version of SfB Response Groups. A call comes in to the organization, and is queued and distributed to “agents” based on a number of factors.

One question that I get often is “who can be an agent in a call queue?”

The short answer is that only users can be agents. This means that Common Area Phones and Meeting Rooms cannot be agents. Well, they can, if you license them as a user. However, if you take advantage of the lower priced CAP or MeetingRoom licenses, then they cannot be agents in a Call Queue.

There are some other restrictions.

If you’re using a Direct Routing number for your Call Queue, your agents must be Teams users. If you use a Calling Plan number, you can use Teams, Skype for Business Online, and Skype for Business Server users.

If you want Teams agents, the agents must be in Teams Only mode. Calls are only handled by Teams apps when a user is in Teams Only.

Bonus: SfB Server Response Groups only offered calls to desktop clients, not mobile. That’s awesome if you assume that everyone who might be an agent is permanently planted in a chair in front of a desk, but that’s not reality! Call Queues allow calls to be offered to users logged on to a number of different devices – including mobiles – check out this doc for details.

(Note: this post has been edited to update it with capabilities made available soon after publication date. While I don’t normally update past blogs with new information, I felt it made sense given the timelines involved.

Updates are coming fast and furious at times from Microsoft. If you have thoughts on revising historical posts (or not!) I’d love to hear from you – hit me up in the comment section or find me on twitter @bumpinthenet)

Surviving the Skype for Business to Teams Transition, for the Organization

By now you’ve probably seen and heard all kinds of rumors, leaks, plans, guidance, announcements, and roadmaps for Skype for Business and Teams. Well, here’s one more! In this post, I’ll focus on what I think organizations should be doing over the next couple of years.

Yup. Years. One of the first things that you should do, is Keep Calm and Skype (for Business) On. There is no “end of life”, “sunset” or “get off or else” date for SfB.

If you visit the Microsoft product lifecycle pages, you can see that SfB Server 2015 is in mainstream support until October 2020, and extended support until October 2025. We know that Skype for Business Server 2019 is coming later this year, and that’ll take you a few more years out for mainstream and extended support. At Ignite last year, an attendee asked if SfB Server 2019 was the last planned version, and the response was that was “unlikely”.

If you’re looking at SfB Server 2019, be aware that there are a few changes. Alas, the list of changes keeps changing, so until the product is finalized there will continue to be some speculation. You can view the Ignite announcement from last year as a general guide to what to expect, though it has been announced that Standard Edition will be available for SfB Server 2019.

So what kind of things should an organization be thinking about then? Well, in case you’ve missed it, Microsoft recommends that you pilot Teams. I have to agree. I was iffy a year ago, but the product has seen massive feature updates since then, with many more to come. The collaboration experience of working within Teams is entirely different that other application and platform combinations from Microsoft and other parties. I find myself spending more time in Teams. If you’re not currently piloting teams, check out https://teamsdemo.office.com and then start your evaluation.

Teams features compliance, security, extensibility, collaboration and mobility stories that are unmatched by other platforms.

If you’re wondering when Teams will have all of the features that you current get in SfB Online, check out this page.

If you’re looking for guidance on how to pilot Teams, this is the spot along with this page.

And if user adoption is important to you (that’s a rhetorical statement! User experience, training and adoption are key!) follow Karuana Gatimu on twitter. Karuana is the Patterns, Practices & Adoption PM in Microsoft Teams, and is a wealth of knowledge.